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CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Eric Fischl Her, 2016. © Eric Fischl, 2018. Private collection

ERIC FISCHL

If Art Could Talk

12 APRIL – 26 AUGUST 2018

If Art Could Talk is the first large-scale thematic exhibition of Eric Fischl’s paintings focusing on art works in situ. From South Pacific souvenirs to Andy Warhol paintings, Fischl has positioned art within his compositions as a driving narrative force. Like a film director, Fischl composes his paintings carefully to create a compelling narrative. At first glance, his works seem to be decisive moments in a larger storyline, captured and frozen, but the surrounding story remains elusive to the viewer. By fabricating and staging his own reality in a single work, Fischl takes complete control, contrasting banal situations and a subliminal world of conflict.

 

From the beginning of the 1980s, Eric Fischl established a renewed interest in painting with his blending of film and photography based decisive moments that incorporated awkward or surreal scenes set in bourgeois suburban situations. The hallucinogenic depictions probed beneath cheerful relationships to discover violence, abuse, corruption, and perversion. The voyeuristic and psychoanalytic themes create instant reactions from viewers.

 

Since that time his practice has developed, although his focus remained on representations of the human figure, to address the subject the contemporary art market. The paintings depict art fairs and feature intricate compositions where people and artworks are layered in sophisticated arrangements of form and color. Fischl has always been a keen observer of the relationships between people, and between people and their surroundings. These paintings demonstrate the artist's observation of body language and the small details that reflect social relationships, particularly in the heady environment of the art fair, with its charged atmosphere of money and taste, financial, and cultural capital. The paintings in If Art Could Talk are sharp social satire as much as they are a loving tribute to the world the artist knows best: the international art scene.

 

Fischl was born in 1948 in New York City. He currently lives and works in Sag Harbor, New York. His paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints have been the subject of numerous solo and major group exhibitions and his work is represented in many museums, as well as prestigious private and corporate collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, St. Louis Art Museum, Louisiana Museum of Art in Denmark, Musèe Beaubourg in Paris, and The Paine Weber Collection.

 

Curated by Peter Doroshenko, Executive Director

 

Major Sponsor:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

Joanne Cassullo   Bob Chase / Hexton Gallery

Michele + Marty Cohen   Tammy Cotton Hartnett   Dallas Art Fair

Mark Giambrone   The Bryant and Nancy Hanley Foundation

Diana Howard + Steve Pully   LAREE HULSHOFF + BEN FISCHER

Bill Hutchinson   Susan MeaD   Gael Neeson + Stefan Edlis

Ringier Collection Switzerland   Per Skarstedt

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Harry Nuriev. Detail of Carousel, 2018. Courtesy of the artist

HARRY NURIEV

6 Fears

12 APRIL – 26 AUGUST 2018

Architect and designer, Harry Nuriev, the founder of Crosby Studios in Moscow and Brooklyn, is a purist who seeks perfect minimalism through an investment in clean architectural shape and form. Nuriev blurs traditional disciplines and creates new ways of looking at spaces. 6 Fears is a glimpse into the varied course of the relationships between an architect and the design briefs set for him. The installation explores Nuriev's design process, working methods, and philosophical approach while illuminating the emotional and artistic content of his work. The project is a record of his unique position at the intersection of art and design—offering personal insights into culture, society, and architecture.

 

Playing with divergent visual directions in the installation, Nuriev positioned tire swans throughout the gallery. These swans, inspired by Soviet lawn kitsch, have been repurposed in quantity to create a new and contemporary Eastern European design language. They establish a playground atmosphere where a purple carousel sits. The visitor-activated carousel invites children to engage in communal movement and a social connection usually only available on outdoor playgrounds. The interaction becomes a conversation point and shared meeting space. A single suspended pane of glass is situated in the gallery, much like an odd utopian sculpture or fragment of a contemporary building. Small window cleaning robots move around the glass creating a clean and polished surface. The digital choreography of the robots frame the installation as an abstract urban landscape. Throughout the exhibition the visitor experiences vignettes of the artist’s reality. Nuriev’s 6 Fears manifests a kind of mise-en-scene in which the position and attitude of the viewer are paramount.

 

Nuriev was born in 1984 in Stavropol, Russia. He lives and works in Moscow, Russia and Brooklyn, New York. While Nuriev has exhibited extensively around the globe, this is his first museum exhibition.

 

Curated by Peter Doroshenko, Executive Director

 

Major Sponsor:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

TAMMY COTTON HARTNETT   Dallas Art Fair

The Bryant and Nancy Hanley Foundation   Muffin + John Lemak

SHELBY WAGNER + NIVEN MORGAN

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Sara Rahbar Refuge (Confessions), 2018. © Sara Rahbar. Courtesy of the artist and Carbon 12

SARA RAHBAR

Carry me home

12 APRIL – 26 AUGUST 2018

Carry me home reflects upon the relationship between self and Other as well as the socio-political tensions present in nationalism’s relationship to violence. The exhibition brings together works that express the range of Rahbar’s practice from cast sculpture to constructions of accumulated objects and textile works. Each piece tells a story of the relationship between individual and society by drawing upon Rahbar’s personal history as well as global dynamics. Rahbar mines the politics of belonging.

 

Rahbar’s bronze body parts are present and unapologetic. Taken from casts of the artist’s own body, they are ripe with tension—muscles clenched as fingers contort and toes twist. It is a utilitarian presentation of limbs as they are reduced to base physical purpose. At times grafted upon pinchers, hooks, and chains, the body parts become symbols of labor and its human element.

 

Similarly, wooden sculptures comprised of found and used objects such as vises and rifle butts rendered slick and shiny through human use, speak to the hybrid man-machine. They are ruminations on the relationship between humans and the tools we employ to build, control, and kill. These are found 'lived' objects with a history of use. Personal in scale the assemblages are simultaneously intimate and imposing.

 

Rahbar’s militarized textiles directly tie to the objects and symbols in which we place faith. Specifically as they relate to national identity and belonging. She contends with the history of the United States as a military super power with strong socio-political ties globally. In doing so she brings attention to the human cost and impact of warfare.

 

As a whole, Carry me home looks at the legacy of war and the construct of the homeland. Rahbar addresses the codified systems of control that we have come to take for granted and the fraught, yet profoundly powerful, notions of belonging and home.

 

Born in Tehran in 1976, Rahbar lives and works in New York. She pursued an interdisciplinary study program in New York and also studied at Central Saint Martins College of Art and design in London. She has exhibited widely in art institutions including but not limited to Queensland Museum, Sharjah Art foundation, Venice Biennial, The Centre Pompidou, and Mannheimer Kunstverein, and her works are included in the permanent collections of the British Museum, The Centre Pompidou, Queesnland Art Gallery, The Davis Museum at Wellesley College, and the Sharjah Art Foundation amongst others.

 

Curated by Justine Ludwig, Deputy Director / Chief Curator

 

Major Sponsor:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

Tammy Cotton Hartnett    Dallas Art Fair

The Bryant and Nancy Hanley Foundation

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Courtesy of the artist

PAULA CROWN

The Architecture of Memory

 

16th International ARCHITECTURE Exhibition

Parallel partner project with La Biennale di Venezia

25 MAY – 26 NOVEMBER 2018

This exhibition places Paula Crown’s artwork in an international architectural biennale festival setting—underscoring the basic critical building blocks that form the languages of contemporary sculpture and architecture. The installation, along with its supporting publication, educational programs, and student workshops provide a valuable overview of Crown’s contribution to recent installation art and object production. The Architecture of Memory, installed in Studio Cannaregio, a new exhibition space in the oldest part of Venice and adjacent to the Jewish Ghetto, runs concurrent with the 16th Venice International Architectural Biennale. The installation adds its own distinctive and independent voice to the festival that focuses on the Biennale theme of Freespace. Crown's multifaceted works draw upon critical references and advanced studio practices—examining public interactions and built space with significance and wit.

 

The Architecture of Memory is a partner program to the American Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia.

 

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