DONATE

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Ghada Amer Portrait of a Girl in an Abstract Composition #2, 2014

© Ghada Amer. Courtesy Cheim & Read, New York

GHADA AMER

Ceramics, Knots, Thoughts, Scraps

30 SEPTEMBER – 17 DECEMBER 2018

Ghada Amer has devoted her career to investigating the female form and its objectification as it is manifested in visual culture. Amer’s motifs are immediately and intentionally familiar to audiences, calling attention to omnipresent depictions of women’s bodies in art history and popular culture. Working in media often seen as gendered, such as embroidery and ceramics, the artist draws her source material from pornography. Her subjects epitomize an exaggerated heteronormative sexual ideal.

 

Ceramics, Knots, Thoughts, Scraps is Amer’s first exhibition dedicated to ceramics. Known for her embroidered works on canvas, Amer has recently turned to a new medium. Her figurative plates and three-dimensional forms reference the legacy of male artists who represent highly gendered practices, including Pablo Picasso, Paul Gauguin, and John Chamberlain. By evoking them, Amer reminds viewers of the predominance of male practitioners and female subjects in the art historical canon. She locates herself inside the lineage of these great artists, who, despite coming from different time periods and different locations, share a similar mythos of genius.

 

In conjunction with her figurative works, Amer presents pieces she refers to as Knots, Thoughts, and Scraps. Here they serve as a codex through which to explore technique and expression. Abstract and process-driven, they offer insight into the artist’s creative process and investment in experimentation.

 

While Amer’s embroidery speaks the language of painting, her ceramics serve as sculpture. In the artist’s hands the delicate, pliable nature of the clay is a fitting vehicle through which to evoke the fragility of edifice. The women Amer renders are presented as vessels. The illusion of women as purely aesthetic entities is easily shattered, much like the material they are incised into.

 

Ghada Amer (b. 1963) was born in Cairo, Egypt. She earned a BFA in 1986 and an MFA in 1989 from École Pilote Internationale d’Art et de Recherche, Villa Arson, Nice, France. In 1997 she was the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, and in 1999, she received the UNESCO award at the Venice Biennale. She has had solo exhibitions at San Francisco Art Institute; De Appel Foundation, Amsterdam; Indianapolis Museum of Art, Ind.; Brooklyn Museum; Davis Museum and Cultural Center, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. She participated in the Johannesburg Biennale in 1997, the Venice Biennale in 1999; the Kwangju Biennale, South Korea, and the Whitney Biennial, both in 2000; and the Venice Biennale in 2005. She now lives and works in New York.

 

Curated by Justine Ludwig

 

Major Sponsors:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

Tammy Cotton Hartnett   LAREE HULSHOFF + BEN FISCHER

MOLLY + JAMES LAZAR

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Ian Davenport Untitled Circle Painting: Blue/Pale Grey/Blue, 2005

Courtesy of the artist and Waddington Custot Galleries

IAN DAVENPORT

Horizons

30 SEPTEMBER – 17 MARCH 2019

The colorful drips of paint in Ian Davenport’s paintings create multi-layered sets of information for viewers to absorb, process, and consider. More concerned with the function of paint as a material than with standard color theory, the work ultimately questions the practice of painting.

 

Historically, painting served as a method in which to represent reality, and artists have long used the tools of perspective and composition to render depictions of the world. Ian Davenport approaches the discipline from a radically different direction. By positioning painting itself as the subject of his research, the artist’s oeuvre acts as a vehicle for new thought around the medium. Consequently, Davenport’s work helps to debunk the common perception that art is measured solely by technique, and remains true to post-conceptual movements by challenging the definition of “labor” in painting.

 

Horizons presents a group of works mapping the ongoing development of the artist’s career. Demonstrating his interest in the theatrics of painting, influence from American abstract painters such as Jackson Pollock and Brice Marden can be found in these bodies of works. The emergence of post-conceptualism in the 1970s ensured complete freedom from the constraints of pure painting technique. Davenport’s process of dripping paint onto metal sheeting results in repetitive lines, imbuing the paintings with a sense of anonymity. Though his presence remains firmly in the background, this aesthetic forces viewers to actively look at the painting.

 

Ian Davenport lives and works in London. He holds a BA from Goldsmiths College, University of London and was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1991, for which he remains the youngest-ever nominee. His work is included in many public collections such as the Tate, London; Centre Pompidou, Paris; and the Dallas Museum of Art, Texas. Davenport has exhibited internationally over the past two decades, with solo exhibitions in Geneva and Saõ Paulo, and in various group shows including the Royal Academy, London. Most recently, his monumental work, Giardini Colourfall, was included in the 2017 Venice Biennale, Italy.

 

Curated by Peter Doroshenko, Executive Director

 

Major Sponsors:

 

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Gold Sponsor:

 

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

ANONYMOUS   Tammy Cotton Hartnett   DAN GALERIA

GALERIE ANDRES THALMANN, ZÜRICH   MARK GIAMBRONE

CARLO GIORDANETTI   SUZANNE + JOHN GOLDEN

LAREE HULSHOFF + BEN FISCHER   MOLLY + JAMES LAZAR

ANN + JOHN McREYNOLDS   CARA + GARY OWENS

BINA PALNITKAR PATEL + DR. NIMESH PATEL   LIZZIE + DAN ROUTMAN

DEBORAH + JOHN SCOTT   LISA SHARDON + ANGELO DeFILIPPO

BETTY + STEVE SILVERMAN   JOHN SUGHRUE

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Boris Mikhailov. Detail from Parliament, 2014–2017. Courtesy of the artist

BORIS MIKHAILOV

Parliament

30 SEPTEMBER – 17 DECEMBER 2018

Produced from 2014–2017, Boris Mikhailov’s new photographic series became a premonition of the recently defined era of post-truth politics. In this body of work, Mikhailov photographs television broadcasts of parliamentary debates, capturing glitches on the screen. The artist corrupts television imagery through physical intervention with the indoor antennae in his living room. Sporadic moments of sublime disorder are then captured on his camera.

 

Parliament fits within overarching themes in Mikhailov’s practice—his interest in undermining the staged reality and the representation of a hero figure, whether it is the Soviet tradition of mass gatherings or the 24/7 news spectacle. Here, the artist uses his camera as a manmade sense organ to interrogate bodies on the screen. The data retrieved is a bewildering kaleidoscope of pixels pointing at the irony and horrors of communication. Sifting through streams of information on television, Mikhailov creates hybrid portraits of contemporary authorities in their pre-verbal state, which evoke emotions of rage, confusion, or anxiety rather than awe and trust. His photographs metaphorically portray the loss of holistic perception of reality and reference the phenomena of informational echo-chambers and the splintering of media communities.

 

Parliament reflects on media ecology and the systemic irregularities of the current information landscape: the inflation and banality of television’s talking heads; tolerance of distortions due to perpetual violations of truth; sensory overload and individual resistance to mass media. Viewed by Mikhailov as “a collision between Cubism and Suprematism,” the series is an homage to the present moment, which sees social behavior shifting from the blind overconsumption of media to a navigation of more trustful pathways to information.

 

Boris Mikhailov was born in 1938 in Kharkiv, Ukraine, the same year television broadcasting started in the USSR. He undertook a photographic practice while working as an engineer in the early 1960s. Under Mikhailov’s leadership, Kharkiv School of Photography emerged as an underground artistic movement, which gave life to new avant-garde aesthetics and photographic conceptualism. Mikhailov has produced more than 30 photographic series and published over 20 photobooks. He was the recipient of the 2012 Spectrum International Prize for photography, the Citibank Photography Prize (later renamed Deutsche Börse Photography Prize), the 2000 Hasselblad Foundation International Award and the 1999 Krazna-Krausz Photography Book Award. Past solo exhibitions include MoMA, ICA Boston, Tate Modern, Fotomuseum Antwerpen, Berlinische Galerie, Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Kunsthalle Wien, and Centro Italiano per la Fotografía, among others. The Parliament series was first shown in 2017 in the Ukrainian Pavilion at the 57th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia.

 

Curated by Peter Doroshenko, Executive Director and Lilia Kudelia

 

Major Sponsors:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

SAMI ARSLANLAR + JOHN CLUTTS   ANAIS ASSOUN   BECKY BRUDER

TAMMY COTTON HARTNETT   CLAIRE DEWAR   PATSY FAGADAU

MARK GIAMBRONE   GEOFF GREEN   LAREE HULSHOFF + BEN FISCHER

MOLLY + JAMES LAZAR   JO MARIE LILLY   LISA MARIE BAKER

KARLA McKINLEY   CARA + GARY OWENS   HARRIS POLAKOFF

LISA SHARDON + ANGELO DeFILIPPO   THE COLOR CONDITION

MAXINE + BEN TROWBRIDGE

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Courtesy of the artist

PAULA CROWN

The Architecture of Memory

 

16th International ARCHITECTURE Exhibition

Parallel partner project with La Biennale di Venezia

25 MAY – 26 NOVEMBER 2018

This exhibition places Paula Crown’s artwork in an international architectural biennale festival setting—underscoring the basic critical building blocks that form the languages of contemporary sculpture and architecture. The installation, along with its supporting publication, educational programs, and student workshops provide a valuable overview of Crown’s contribution to recent installation art and object production. The Architecture of Memory, installed in Studio Cannaregio, a new exhibition space in the oldest part of Venice and adjacent to the Jewish Ghetto, runs concurrent with the 16th Venice International Architectural Biennale. The installation adds its own distinctive and independent voice to the festival that focuses on the Biennale theme of Freespace. Crown's multifaceted works draw upon critical references and advanced studio practices—examining public interactions and built space with significance and wit.

 

The Architecture of Memory is a partner program to the American Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia.

 

MORE INFO

161 Glass Street Dallas Texas 75207 USA +214 821 2522