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Invisible Cities artist Ho Tzu Nyen. Still from EARTH, 2009–2012. Courtesy of the artist

INVISIBLE CITIES

Moving Images from Asia

Chim↑Pom: Non-Burnable

29 SEPTEMBER - 17 DECEMBER 2017

Invisible Cities showcases the work of more than 25 renowned and emerging contemporary video artists from China, Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Presented as a compilation of fragmentary urban images, this project addresses perceptions of various Asian cities in the collective mind. In their vignettes, artists reference traces of colonialism, globalization, and the political aspects of urban development to examine the concept of the “perpetual foreigner” within contemporary cosmopolitan culture. From the stories of vanished cities of the past to the destroyed cities of the present time, the film narratives encapsulate the memory of specific sites and individuals’ interactions with different landscapes. These pivotal works represent recent key developments in moving image art in Asia.

 

Invisible Cities is a collaboration between Dallas Contemporary, the Moving Image Archive for Contemporary Art: MIACA (Hong Kong), and Crow Collection of Asian Art (Dallas). Much like Italo Calvino’s celebrated novel, Invisible Cities (1976), that inspired the project’s title, this multi-institutional collaboration honors exchange over difference, experience over imagination, authenticity over originality, and acknowledges cultural hybridity.

 

Co-organized by Hitomi Hasegawa, Director of MIACA; Lilia Kudelia, Assistant Curator at Dallas Contemporary; and Jacqueline Chao, Curator of Asian Art at the Crow Collection of Asian Art

 

Participating artists: Yu Araki, Martha Atienza, Kai-Chun Chiang, Chim Pom, Come Inside, Bontaro Dokuyama, Hikaru Fuji, Ho Rui An, Ho Tzu Nyen, Kyun-Chome, Leung Chi Wo,

Lim Minouk, Nguyen Trinh Thi, Ellen Pau, Taiki Sakpisit, Moe Satt, Momoko Seto, Tadasu Takamine, Kota Takeuchi + Finger Pointing Worker, Ming Wong, Wong Ping, Sun Xun,

Zhou Tao

 

Chim↑Pom

Non-Burnable

 

Responding instinctively to contemporary events, Chim↑Pom continuously creates works that intervene in society with strong social messages. Their exhibition Non-Burnable, part of the Invisible Cities project, spotlights the decade-long artistic career of the Tokyo-based collective. In their multidisciplinary practice, the artists examine themes of inheritance, survival, and co-existence by responding to environmental and political circumstances.

 

Chim↑Pom is recognized among the few artists who spearheaded critical reflections on the Tōhoku Earthquake, which caused the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011. Their work juxtaposes the idea of an atomic sublime with the notion of nuclear disaster as lived experience. Informed by atomic bombs as a motif of collective memory, they invest in building meaningful relationships between time and historical sites such as Hiroshima.

 

Non-Burnable revolves around the concept of non-combustible waste represented by radiation, environmental pollution, and even symbolic prayers sent to the city of Hiroshima from people all over the world in the form of hand-folded cranes. Using a small collection of the 10,000 tons of sacred, and therefore indestructible, origami cranes sent to Hiroshima each year, Chim↑Pom reflects upon peace invocation and the legacy of communal trauma.

 

The burden of nuclear waste and post-Fukushima existence is best exemplified by Chim↑Pom’s project Super Rat (2006). “Super Rat” is a nickname coined by pest controllers for a new breed of poison-immune rats proliferating in urban areas throughout Japan. Resembling the popular Pokémon character Pikachu, Chim↑Pom’s Super Rat is an attempt to establish a new cheerful mythology, which merges traditional and contemporary popular culture. For Chim↑Pom, Super Rat symbolizes “Japanese people who live in the midst of radioactive contamination and people who face hardship in society around the world.”

 

Chim↑Pom is an artist collective founded in 2005 in Tokyo, Japan. The members are Ryuta Ushiro, Yasutaka Hayashi, Ellie, Masataka Okada, Motomu Inaoka, and Toshinori Mizuno. In 2015, they opened their artist-run space, Garter, in Tokyo to curate and showcase work by many of their contemporaries. They also initiated and co-organized an international exhibition Don’t Follow the Wind launched on March 11, 2015 inside the nuclear exclusion zone in Fukushima. Chim↑Pom has been the subject of many solo and group exhibitions, including the 20th Biennale of Sydney (2016); MoMA PS1 (2014 and 2011); Saatchi Gallery (2015); the 9th Shanghai Biennale (2012); and the 29th São Paulo Biennial (2010). The group received the Prudential Eye Awards in 2015 under the categories Best Emerging Artist Using Digital/Video and Best Emerging Artist of the Year, as well as the Re-Act: New Art Competition 2007 Award at the Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art.

 

Curated by Lilia Kudelia, Assistant Curator and Hitomi Hasegawa, MIACA

 

Co-Organized by:

 

 

Major Sponsors:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

 

Tammy Cotton Hartnett

 

Media Sponsor:

 

 

Dallas Contemporary is supported by the City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs

McDermott & McGough Time Balls, 1921, 1988. Collection Bruno Bischofberger, Switzerland

McDERMOTT & McGOUGH

I've Seen the Future and I'm Not Going

29 SEPTEMBER - 17 DECEMBER 2017

Since 1980, the artists David McDermott and Peter McGough (b. 1952 and 1958) have collaborated on an unprecedented gesamtkunstwerk (living artwork), an all-encompassing entwinement of their lives and work that has variously explored issues of gay identity, societal repression, and performative time travel.

 

Known by their surnames, McDermott & McGough achieved notoriety in the bohemian quarters of downtown New York in the 1980s for their self-imposed immersion in the Victorian era. From the outset of their collaboration, the artists transformed their dress, their home and their art studios—down to the materials and techniques they utilized—to adhere to aesthetic and technological conventions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Dubbing their practice a "time experiment," McDermott & McGough have consistently challenged the chronological boundaries of art history and cultural identity.

 

I’ve Seen the Future and I’m Not Going, which borrows its title from one of the artists’ emblematic text works, surveys McDermott & McGough’s precocious embrace of radical identity politics via their anachronistic approach to art and life. The exhibition offers a comprehensive exploration of their “time experiment,” encompassing photography, painting, sculpture, film and installation environments from over three decades of the artists’ oeuvre.

 

By rejecting the contemporary present in favor of an invented queer past, McDermott & McGough asserted a revolutionary gay agency well ahead of their time. In light of current struggles for LGBTQ rights in the United States and around the world, McDermott & McGough emerge as critical, prescient figures in the address of queer liberation through radical art practice.

 

Curated by Alison Gingeras, Adjunct Curator

 

Presenting Sponsor:

 

 

Major Sponsors:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

JOANNE CASSULLO    AL COLLINS    ANGELO DE FILIPPO    WENDY FISHER

JERRY GOROVOY    TAMMY COTTON HARTNETT    JULIE HAWES

ROGER KOBES + MICHAEL KELLER    MUFFIN + JOHN LEMAK

STANLEY W. LIGHT    MICHAEL MEAGER + DANIEL ROMUALDEZ

LEIGH RINEARSON    SHELLY + BARRY ROSENBERG    GOWRI SHARMA

RICHARD SMITH    FILIPPO TATTONI-MARCOZZI    MAXINE TROWBRIDGE

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Kiki Smith Winged Messenger, 2009. © Kiki Smith. Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate

Courtesy Pace Gallery

KIKI SMITH

Mortal

29 SEPTEMBER - 17 DECEMBER 2017

Kiki Smith’s Mortal explores life as a pilgrimage. Amassing works from the last ten years of Smith’s oeuvre, the exhibition focuses on images of birth, learning, love, death, and rebirth. The artist draws upon a spectrum of religious and spiritual iconography, from the annunciation to baptismal fonts, to explore the relationship between the quotidian and the sacred. Through the incorporation of a multitude of different figures, the exhibition ultimately speaks to the life journey and shared human experience.

 

Central to Mortal is Smith’s massive installation Pilgrim, comprised of thirty mouth-blown, stained-glass panels portraying the stages of a woman’s life. This work was inspired by an eighteenth-century silk needlepoint by Prudence Punderson entitled The First, Second, and Last Scene of Mortality. The work depicts the life cycle of a woman from cradle to coffin: infancy, womanhood, and death. Similarly, Smith presents a human life to be explored through a single environment. The weightless figures painted onto the glass panes have no fixed identity, but are instead place markers for birth, loss, death, and milestones in a woman's lifetime. Taken as a whole, Mortal is a meditation on the human life cycle, the inheritance of ritual, and the transference of information between individuals.

 

Kiki Smith was born in 1954 in Nuremberg, Germany, and is currently based in New York. She uses a broad variety of materials to continuously expand and evolve a body of work that includes sculpture, printmaking, photography, drawing and textiles. Smith has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions worldwide including over 25 museum exhibitions. Her work has been featured at five Venice Biennales, including the 2017 edition. She is an adjunct professor at NYU and Columbia University.

 

Curated by Justine Ludwig, Director of Exhibitions / Senior Curator

 

Major Sponsors:

NANCY C. + RICHARD R. ROGERS

 

Education Sponsor:

 

 

Supported by:

 

 

 

Tammy Cotton Hartnett

 

Media Sponsor:

 

Boris Mikhailov. Detail from Parliament series, 2014–2017. Courtesy of the artist

BORIS MIKHAILOV

Parliament

57th INTERNATIONAL ART EXHIBITION—La BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

13 MAY - 26 NOVEMBER 2017

The Ministry of Culture of Ukraine has selected Dallas Contemporary to organize the Ukrainian Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale. DC Executive Director Peter Doroshenko and Assistant Curator Lilia Kudelia will present an exhibition of work by Boris Mikhailov at Studio Cannaregio in Venice, Italy.

 

More info at ukrainianpavilion2017.org.

Shepard Fairey Rise Above, 2012. Singleton Avenue, Dallas, TX. Photo by Colleen McInerney

SHEPARD FAIREY

Citywide Street Mural Project

ONGOING

Dallas Contemporary has invited Los Angeles based street artist Shepard Fairey to create more than 12 murals throughout the city with a focus on West Dallas. Known for his iconic designed President Obama HOPE poster, Fairey has worked as an artist creating works on the streets and globally in public spaces using posters, stickers, wheat paste and painted murals.

 

CLICK HERE to view mural location map

 

Español

El renombrado artista callejero de Los Ángeles Shepard Fairey fue invitado por el Dallas Contemporary para crear más de 12 murales a lo largo de toda la ciudad con un énfasis especial en el oeste de Dallas.

161 Glass Street Dallas Texas 75207 USA +214 821 2522